In Search of Our Times Discussion Series

We live in a polarized society. Republicans accuse Democrats of socialism, Democrats charge Republicans with fascism. It seems impossible to find basic agreement on topics like immigration, climate change, gun control, science, truth, the news, or even the weather. In these times of confusion and anger, the Wende Museum is inviting artists, writers, scholars, philosophers, journalists, politicians, and freethinkers to discuss what brought us here, and to open up new perspectives.
 
The six panel discussions are presented as part of Wende Conversations: A Discussion Series Supported by Susan Horowitz and Rick Feldman.

 

The Power of Culture
Sunday, October 13, 2019
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion

How can the arts contribute to a better understanding of our world and our lives? What do they have to say that cannot be expressed by other means? How can art and culture impact political realities in a culture of power politics, and what gives them the moral authority to do so? Featuring artist and writer Farrah Karapetian; artist, theater director, curator, and art journalist Ada Mukhina; architect and thinker Kulapat Yantrasast; and Patrick Scott, artistic and executive director of Jacaranda Music. Moderated by Joes Segal, Chief Curator and Director of Programming at the Wende Museum.

RSVP Here

 

The History of Forgetting
Sunday, January 12, 2020
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion

We can only learn from history if we remember it. But how do we decide what to remember? What materials are ignored by museums, archives, and libraries, and get lost forever? When does memory become an unbearable burden, weighing us down instead of enriching our perspective? 

RSVPs open December 12, 2020 at 10 a.m.

 

Roads and Shortcuts to Utopia
Sunday, March 8, 2020
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion


The twentieth century has seen the devastating effects of a blind belief in ideological blueprints, from fascism and national socialism to “real existing” socialism. But can we survive without utopian ideas? How much dreaming is needed to shape our world?

RSVPs open February 7, 2020 at 10 a.m.

 

Fact and Fiction
Sunday, May 10, 2020
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion

The twentieth century saw a constant struggle between media propaganda and media disclosures, top-down and bottom-up counter-narratives. How does twenty-first-century social media fit in this pattern? Has it contributed to the democratization of knowledge or to a stronger filtering and framing of reality? Why has “fake news” become a serious competitor to “real” news? And how to differentiate between the two? 

RSVPs open April 10, 2020 at 10 a.m.

 

Walls and Borders
Sunday, July 12, 2020
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion

Globalization is all about the free flow of people, goods, capital, and ideas, but more than ever states are encapsulating themselves, closing their borders amid heated battles about immigration. Why are border crossings, both physically and culturally, conceived as a threat? What motivates the current worldwide tendency toward exclusion?

RSVPs open June 12, 2020 at 10 a.m.

 

September 13, 2020
2 p.m.: Reception
3 p.m.: Panel discussion

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. What is its current role and status? Is it still possible to believe in universal human rights, even if they are constantly challenged at home and abroad? Has postmodernism eroded the belief in universal ethics? How could we restore ethics in politics?
 
RSVPs open August 13, 2020 at 10 a.m.